MyHeritage DNA Ethnicity Estimate

Ethnicity Estimate

About three months ago I reported that I had expanded my DNA reach by uploading my raw AncestryDNA results to the MyHeritage site. Then, on June 1 of this year, MyHeritage announced that it would provide an ethnicity estimate report to everyone that uploads their DNA to their site. Previously, they only offered this to those that tested directly with their service. It has been interesting to compare the ethnicity estimate report from MyHeritage to that of AncestryDNA.

I really liked the “reveal” experience that MyHeritage provides. Here you can see mine.

MyHeritage DNA ethnicity results

Ancestry Ethnicity Estimate

 

Apples-to-Apples?

It is difficult to compare them exactly in an apples-to-apples sort of way. However, some are easier to compare. For example, Ancestry has a region called “Europe West,” whereas MyHeritage has one called “North and West European.” These two results reveal the biggest difference between the ethnicity estimates at 30% to 51.9%, respectively. Next, Ancestry has “Great Britain” and “Ireland,” in contrast to MyHeritage that groups them as “English” and “Irish, Scottish, and Welsh.” I can’t tell if Ancestry lumps the Scots and Welsh in their Great Britain, or whether they report the other Gaelic cultures as Irish.

For comparison, then I simply added those together. This results in a reported total “United Kingdom” percentage of 63% from Ancestry and 46.2% from MyHeritage. This pretty much eats up the difference that was shown in the West European ethnicity estimate. The change left over at Ancestry is about 7% and is composed of 5% Europe East, 1% Scandinavian, and 1% Finland/Northwest Russia. My great-grandmother was born is Danish, so I would have expected a higher percentage of Scandinavian. However, that line could easily appear in the “West European” or even “Great Britain” groups (thanks Vikings!). I am baffled by the Europe East and the Finnish numbers.

Only 1.9% is left over in the MyHeritage ethnicity estimate and it was all lumped in to “South Asian.” I think it would be very cool to have some ancestry from the Indian subcontinent, but no research has revealed this so far. I am even more confused by this finding than I was for the “loose change” from Ancestry.

What’s Next?

When it comes to DNA genealogy, I still consider myself a neophyte. I simply haven’t had the time yet to devote to really learning the tools to make this more than just an interesting side note to my research. The good news, is that opportunities to learn abound, and tools are getting more and more mainstream.

This week I uploaded my DNA results to GEDmatch.com. A future post will report what I learn from that.

What surprises have you seen in your ethnicity estimate from Ancestry or MyHeritage?

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